Healthy Paws Pet Insurance and Foundation.

Hyperphosphatemia In Dogs

Cost of Treatment: $150 to $1500

What Is Hyperphosphatemia In Dogs?

Phosphorus and calcium are the most abundant minerals in your dog’s body. The body needs phosphorus for various functions, such as filtering waste and repairing tissue and cells. Other functions of phosphorus are muscle contraction and nerve function. Most phosphorus is stored in the bones, but a small percentage circulates in the blood (less than 6.0 mg/dL in dogs). The word hyperphosphatemia means high levels of phosphorus in the blood. The levels of phosphorous are controlled by the kidneys and the parathyroid hormone (PTH). This hormone prevents levels from rising too high, so if the phosphorous levels in your dog are high, it is likely that he/she is suffering from a kidney disease.

Symptoms Of Hyperphosphatemia In Dogs

Hyperphosphatemia is a sign of other diseases such as kidney failure. Dogs with hyperphosphatemia may also present:

  • Decreased bone density
  • Excessive thirst
  • Excessive urination
  • Muscle tremors
  • Muscle wasting
  • Seizures

Causes Of Hyperphosphatemia In Dogs

 The following conditions are often related to hyperphosphatemia:

  • Renal failure
  • Intracellular malfunction,
  • Thyroid gland disorders
  • Parathyroid gland disorders
  • Diabetes

Treatment Of Hyperphosphatemia In Dogs

If your dog’s hyperphosphatemia was secondary to kidney disease, the treatment will start with fluid therapy followed by a low phosphorous diet. Your veterinarian will likely prescribe phosphate binders to link free-floating phosphorous molecules. Phosphorous and calcium bind to create your dog’s bones, so in a dog with high levels of phosphorous, it is possible they will also need to minimize calcium intake. If your dog has decreased parathyroid hormone levels, your dog will need hormonal therapy.

Summary
Article Name
Hyperphosphatemia In Dogs
Description
The word hyperphosphatemia means high levels of phosphorus in the blood. The levels of phosphorous are controlled by the kidneys and the parathyroid hormone (PTH).
Author
Publisher Name
Pet Insurance U

Search

2016 Comparison Chart X